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Processor Type

Embest OMAP3530 Evaluation Kit

May 18, 2011

The latest Kit from Embest, the Embest DevKit8000, Single Board Computer has an OMAP3530 microprocessor. All OMAP features are fully supported and the board supports up to 256MByte Duel Data Rate RAM (DDR) SDRAM and 256 MByte NAND Flash. The system also supports a  high-speed USB2.0 OTG port. Many additional hardware are included such as: […]

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What is PoP Memory?

December 19, 2009
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Package-on-Package or (PoP) memory was created as a way to reduce the physical size of the memory sub-system on a single board computer. The basic idea is to stack two BGA devices one on top of the other as shown above. PoP Memory has Several Advantages Including: More reliable manufacture because the memory sub-system can […]

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OMAP3530 Single Board Computer – Beagle Board

December 16, 2009
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The Beagle board is a low-cost single board computer that packs tremendous power in a small (3″ x 3.1″) cost-effective (sub-$200.00 us) package. Designed by a small team at TI, the Beagle Board is the perfect environment to learn about real-time embedded systems and programming. The board has excellent I/O support (detailed below) with Ethernet […]

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Single Board Computers by Processor Type

October 31, 2009

Single board Computers are based on a wide array of microprocessors and micro-controllers. For low-cost applications with simple software, low-end processors like the microchip PIC or the Intel 805X family can be used. The processor used determines the range of processing power and in some respects the I/O available on the Single Board Computer. For […]

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MIPS Based Single Board Computers

October 31, 2009

Like ARM, MIPS licenses out it’s IP to allow licensees to create their own variants of the MIPS chip which includes their own custom functions and peripherals. MIPS processor cores are used in many demanding applications like communications and graphics. There is a thriving ecosystem of tools to support development. Typical processors from the family […]

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Microchip PIC Processor Based Single Board Computers

October 31, 2009

The Microchip PIC has become wildly popular as a low-end processing engine. Used to replace logic and create ever more complex consumer products single Board Computers based on the PIC family were a natural choice. These boards are very low-cost and have a wide range of tools. Some examples of the PIC microchip family of […]

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X86 Intel Single Board Computers

October 31, 2009

The venerable X86 architecture is by far the most popular processor family used to build Single Board Computers. Intel has leveraged their dominance on the desktop to allow them to continually innovate while improving price/performance. In fact, the X86 processor architecture evolves so quickly that it is hard to buy a Single board Computer that […]

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PowerPC Single Board Computers

October 31, 2009

The Freescale (spun out from Motorola) PowerPC (now called Power Architecture™) family of processors is often used for Single Board Computers employed in communication applications. While not fast enough to support in-band data at maximum rates, these processors provide many powerful communications engines implemented as internal peripherals.   Freescale has continually releases new versions of […]

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ARM Processor Based Single Board Computers

October 30, 2009

The ARM family of processors are widely used by Single Board Computer manufacturers.  ARM processors are extremely popular for embedded systems development and are common in devices such as cell phones and portable instruments due to their low power capabilities. There are many ARM processor manufacturers, called “licensees” since ARM licenses out the rights to […]

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